Holy See Study Mission and Diocesan computers hacked, alleges US firm

computer screen monitor
Photo by Florian Olivo/Unsplash

HONG KONG (SE): A cybersecurity firm, Recorded Future, based in the United States, has accused China of hacking Vatican computers as well as those of the Diocese of Hong Kong, the Holy See’s Study Mission in Hong Kong, and other Catholic organisations from May.

Chinese hackers allegedly hacked into the Vatican server and the Holy See’s network, including its Study Mission in Hong Kong. Other victims include the Pontifical Institute for Foreign Missions (PIME) in Milan, reported AsiaNews, a news portal administered by the PIME.

Image credit: Aleksandar Malivuk/Shutterstock (CNA)

Recorded Future detected the attacks and, in a recently released report, explained that they began last May. According to the reports, the attack was the work of a group called RedDelta, an entity backed by the Chinese government.

AsiaNews reported that the US company suspected the attacks were an attempt to steal secrets and spy on the Vatican ahead of a possible meeting between Holy See and Chinese delegations to discuss the renewal of the provisional agreement on the appointment of bishops, signed two years ago and which expires in September this year.

Monsignor Javier Herrera Corona, head of the Holy See Study Mission, in a statement, said that his institution had also experienced a long history of cyberattacks, including scams and fraudulent emails, but said he had no evidence of the specific attack alleged by Recorded Future: malware hidden in an email sent to him from a Vatican official.

READ  Appeal from the Colloquium of Six Religious Leaders of Hong Kong regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus

Monsigor Herrera declined to comment on the impact the hacking allegations might have on the possible renewal of the Vatican’s agreement with Beijing, but noted that the Vatican doesn’t discuss information related to the negotiations through electronic channels, suggesting the damage caused by any breach would be limited.

Related articles
Rise in human trafficking amid Covid-19 pandemic
Chains wrapped around the wrists of a man illustrate trafficking and enslavement. Photo: CNS/Reuters
Chains wrapped around the wrists of a man illustrate trafficking and enslavement. Photo: CNS/Reuters

VATICAN (CNS): As governments and world leaders struggle to contain the Covid-19 coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, they must also work harder Read more

In the same storm but not all in same boat
People wearing face masks line up and wait to enter a pharmacy in Cochabamba, Bolivia, on July 21. Photo: CNS/Reuters
People wearing face masks line up and wait to enter a pharmacy in Cochabamba, Bolivia, on July 21. Photo: CNS/Reuters

VATICAN (CNS): Humana Communitas’ in the Age of Pandemic, a new, eight-page reflection the Pontifical Academy for Life, notes that Read more

Justice and dignity not the privilege of the rich
Women religious from around the world gathered in Rome in 2019 to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Talitha Kum, an international network of religious women fighting human trafficking. Photo: CNS/courtesy International Union of Superiors General
Women religious from around the world gathered in Rome in 2019 to celebrate the 10th anniversary of Talitha Kum, an international network of religious women fighting human trafficking. Photo: CNS/courtesy International Union of Superiors General

VATICAN (CNS): “The principle of profit maximisation, isolated from all other considerations, leads to a model of exclusion that violently Read more

READ  Appeal from the Colloquium of Six Religious Leaders of Hong Kong regarding the outbreak of novel coronavirus
Parishes need conversion to be missionary says new Vatican Instruction
Mass at Rosary Church, Tsim Sha Tsui. File photo
Mass at Rosary Church, Tsim Sha Tsui. File photo

HONG KONG (SE): The Vatican’s Congregation for the Clergy released The pastoral conversion of the Parish community in the service Read more

Share: